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Junior Attorneys, New Attorneys & Law Students

 
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 Shauna C. Bryce as a legal careers panelist for “Carpe JDiem: Leveraging Legal Skills in Alternative Careers” at University of Pennsylvania School of Law. Moderated by Vivia Chen, senior columnist at The American Lawyer and the creator of The Careerist blog, with Djung Tran of Tran Law Associations; Scott Lee of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission; and David Zhou of the SDNY U.S. Attorney's Office.

Shauna C. Bryce as a legal careers panelist for “Carpe JDiem: Leveraging Legal Skills in Alternative Careers” at University of Pennsylvania School of Law. Moderated by Vivia Chen, senior columnist at The American Lawyer and the creator of The Careerist blog, with Djung Tran of Tran Law Associations; Scott Lee of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission; and David Zhou of the SDNY U.S. Attorney's Office.

Do you need help standing out?

If you’re a junior lawyer, a new attorney, a traditional law school student (straight from college to law school), or a non-traditional law student (second-career, multiple degrees, more than two years of work history, etc.), then right now you’re facing questions about:

  • Showcasing your individuality on paper and in interviews
  • Converting the $200,000—or more—you invested in your law degree into a legal or law-related job that’s full-time, permanent, and paying
  • Navigating a legal job market that continues to be highly competitive
  • Uncovering and seizing opportunities—not just for a job now, but also to build your legal career
  • Understanding, meeting, and even exceeding hiring attorneys’ expectations 
  • And a whole lot more
I just accepted an offer at [AmLaw 100 law firm], as an Associate in their real estate section. Graduating from a Tier 4 school, I never thought this would be possible. I owe a huge part of it to you!
— Junior real estate associate
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Career Challenges 

The exact numbers wax and wane, but each year there are some 125,000 students enrolled in law school, and tens of thousands joining the ranks of newly licensed attorneys. 

Your JD or LLM is the starting point of your legal career, not the end goal. You’ll need more than a law degree to wow hiring attorneys with your potential to be a good lawyer. But many law students don’t know how to write a résumé that impresses employers. They don’t teach that in law school. Worse, résumé samples from law school career services centers often don’t help you stand out. Instead, they make everyone look the same. And if you were all the same, then that format would serve you equally well. But what do you do if…

  • You’re more than an inflexible résumé template?
  • Your GPA doesn’t reflect your abilities or you’re a hands-on learner?
  • Your current résumé focuses on your college jobs in retail or restaurants? 
  • You have questions about getting your legal career off to a good start?
  • Your law school career services center can’t offer you the individual help you need?

Every junior associate or entry-level attorney is different, with different backgrounds, strengths, weaknesses, and career goals. You’re applying in different areas of the country, to different types of employers who look for different qualifications…

An aspiring litigator is great with people and great on his feet.

He took two clinics and summered at litigation boutiques were he excelled. But he’s not so great in the classroom. His grades just don’t reflect his ability. How can he find and market himself to employers who value his strengths rather than focus on his weakness?

An entry-level lawyer with an M.S. and a B.S. in mechanical engineering co-authored six academic papers.

She’s now a patent agent in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Now that she has two years of training, how can she transition to a patent attorney role?

A second-career law school student worked in his family’s construction company for six years and then as a real estate broker for another 10 years.

He isn’t a traditional law student and, while he understands the idea of paying one’s dues, he doesn’t want a traditional entry-level lawyer experience. How can he get proper credit at a law firm for his prior work experience and transferrable skills?

A law student is fluent in Arabic. Anticipating she would be an immigration lawyer, she attended her local Tier 3 law school because of its strong ties to the local immigrant community.

She worked full-time during law school at a local bank, and now she’s decided to pursue a career in Islamic finance. Is it possible to land a role in a multinational financial services institution or a Big 4 consulting firm?

A junior associate wants résumé writing help, but finds hiring a professional to be a financial commitment he hesitates to make on top of his student loan obligations.

Yet, he needs more individualized assistance than any résumé book can provide. How can he get personalized, low-cost résumé help?

A newly admitted attorney first generation American.

She’s also the first college graduate—and first lawyer—in her family so she can’t inherit a professional network from her family. How can she start to build a network of her own?

*Samples are composites designed to protect the identities of individual clients.

Career Services

We offer writing and coaching services to address the needs of those new to the legal market. Just a few of the areas we can help you with are:

Writing and Interviewing

  • Résumés
  • Cover letters and correspondence
  • LinkedIn profiles
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Identification of value and potential
  • Interview prep for OCIs, callbacks, and other interviews
  • Deciding on what to do with your law degree
  • Discussing gap years, bad grades, and other issues

Immediate Career Decision-Making

  • Stating your career off right
  • Networking 101
  • Demonstrating interest in a practice area
  • Identifying your best fit roles and employers
  • Building career narratives around non-linear work experience
  • Getting sponsors and mentors
  • Leveraging early career or military experience
  • Getting credit for language and cultural fluencies
  • Changing job markets
  • Deciding among job offers

On-Demand Résumé Writing

Get the help you want, when you want, at an affordable price.

We get that cost is a major factor if you’re at the start of your career—so we’ve pioneered a way to provide nationally recognized coaching and résumé writing help to entry-level lawyers needing help fast and affordably—while also needing more personalization and creativity than law school career services and résumé templates can provide.

Instead of hiring a true professional résumé writer to write your résumé from scratch or booking a multi-session package with a professional career coach—both long and expensive processes—we save you time and money through interactive, on-demand services. These services have proven so popular and effective that we no longer offer bespoke writing for new attorneys.

Even better... our fast and affordable on-demand résumé writing saves new attorneys and law students 50% to 75% the cost of traditional résumé writing. 

Career Coaching and Interview Prep

We also have coaching for new lawyers and law students. It’s also simple: just tell us the issues you’d like to discuss, and send us your current résumé so that we have some context. We can talk about interviewing, job search, networking—anything you need.

 Shauna Bryce speaking at an Envision event in Virginia.

Shauna Bryce speaking at an Envision event in Virginia.

LinkedIn Profile Optimization

We recommend all lawyers have a strong, polished presence on LinkedIn—get started early in your career!

Sample Client Testimonials

Why work with Bryce Legal? Here’s what our junior attorney, new attorney, and law student clients say. For even more testimonials, please see Our Client Testimonials.